Call Now: 1-480-951-6599

Summer Vacation

Summer Vacation is just around the corner — only a few weeks away!  I know, it’s hard to believe, and that means trips, child care, and camp.  To make sure that you and your co-parent are on the same page, make sure to review your parenting orders and start planning now.  Here are some things to consider: Give timely notice of your vacation plans, if it’s required by your orders.  Don’t wait until the last minute to let your co-parent know your vacation dates.  Remember, holidays trump vacation, so pay attention to Memorial Day and Independence Day holidays. Provide a detailed itinerary, including mode of travel, route, flight numbers (if applicable), hotel or lodging information, phone numbers, and departure and arrival times.  No, it’s not too much information and it’s not about control or permission.  This type of information can be critical in the event of an emergency situation. Coordinate the child care or summer camp that your child will be attending so that there is no unnecessary overlap or expense.  One-sided decisions about where Joey and Suzi will be spending their summer days is not endearing to your co-parent! Extended family visits require additional coordination.  If you want the kids to go to Grandma and Grandpa’s farm for a month during the summer, consider how that may impact  your co-parent’s summer plans before you make a promise you can’t keep.  First, talk it over with your co-parent to find out if it’s feasible and then consider whether the two of you want to agree on some “make up” time.  Some co-parents simply agree that time away from both parents is “regular” parenting...

Sell, Hold, Short Sell, Foreclose?

Oh my, we are in a pickle here in Arizona.  Our real estate bubble burst with a bang and left many homeowners under water and holding real estate — and debt — without equity.  We’re not alone in that dilemma, but we are one of the hardest hit areas of the country and are regularly featured in national news stories about the mortgage lending and foreclosure crisis. If you are living in an upside down house, love it beyond reason, and intend to stay there the rest of your life, then it’s probably a good idea to hang onto it.  However, if you’re in the midst of a divorce or break up and one salary won’t cover the carrying costs, you are probably having a very different conversation.  And that conversation can be making you anxious, stressed, depressed, sad, angry, resentful, or all of the above!  While there are many opinions and theories about what you “should” do or “should not” do regarding underwater real estate, in the final analysis, it is a very personal financial decision.  It is not (or should not be) an emotional decision.  Houses are investments, in the form of real property, that you and/or your marital community made.  The investment is neither good nor bad.  The return on investment, however, has made millionaires of some and bankrupted many thousands more. Clients ask me all the time, “Should we sell, hold, short sell, or foreclose?”  While I don’t pretend to have all the answers to every issue that one simple question implies, I do have two answers.  One, please call on a professional to assist you in evaluating the issue.  I recommend...

Flat Fees Are Finally Here!

Billable Hours Lawyers are taught at the outset of our careers that the Billable Hour rules the world.  Coming from the business community, I always found the billing practices of law firms to be rather odd.  In most other service industries, the customer obtains a quote or bid or scope of work that outlines what you will pay for the work you want done.  Law firms (as well as accounting, and some other professions), on the other hand, almost always operate on an open-ended contract that often brings a frightful surprise to clients at the end of the month.  A common analogy is taking your car to the garage for repair and the mechanic informs you that he might be able to fix your car, but he’s not sure how long it will take and can only tell you what it will cost when he’s finished fixing it.  Another good comparison is hiring someone to paint your house by the hour.  Either way, an open-ended hourly system of billing invites inefficiencies and does not serve our clients as well as we should. Variable Costs of Litigation Legal fees can vary greatly from firm to firm and can increase exponentially with even a little bit of conflict between the parties.  It’s been very difficult for the Family Law bar to adopt flat fees because of the moving target of litigation.  For example, given two cases that have almost identical fact patterns, assets, and liabilities, Case A’s litigated divorce will cost around $30,000 each and Case B”s litigated divorce will cost in excess of $150,000 each.   And it’s hard to know, in advance, which case an attorney might...